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Science of TRON

Listen to audio from the "Science of TRON" panel, featuring director Joe Kosinski, producer Sean Bailey, and science consultants Sean Carroll & John Dick. Learn More

Thanksgiving

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Scream Off the Thanksgiving Pounds!

A recent study from the University of Westminster found that watching scary movies may help people burn calories and in turn, lose weight. 

The study suggests that watching scary movies may cause the viewer’s pulse to quicken and the body to experience a surge of adrenaline; two factors that are often seen in intensely stressful situations. Both are known to increase the viewer’s metabolic rate and decrease appetite, which could ultimately lead to calories being burned at a faster rate. 

In an unrelated study, the American Council on Fitness found that the average American enjoys around 3,000 calories and 229 grams of fat on Thanksgiving. That is 1,000 more calories than the suggested 2,000 calorie per day diet, not even considering the amount of fat we consume during that deliciously decadent meal! 

So, after all the turkey, gravy and stuffing have been enjoyed, it seems like the perfect time to take part in a scare-a-thon of epic proportions! 

Science Helps You Cook the Perfect Turkey

Let’s talk turkey, science lovers. We’ve already showed you how to incorporate science into Halloween but now it’s time to “science up” Thanksgiving. No, we are not suggesting something along the lines of Schrodinger’s Turkey. Instead, we’ve rounded up ideas on how to cook the big, tasty bird with the help of chemistry!

Whether you are a fan of dark meat or light meat, you have to agree that turkey is delicious – and not easy to cook. How many movies and TV episodes feature a turkey mishap? More than we can count. Think of the turkey burning to a crisp when the Friends gang accidentally locked themselves out of the apartment, or the shuffling of the turkey from oven to oven in 2003’s Pieces of April. The bird is the word, and you can't have it run “afowl.”