Hollywood: Through The Google Glass

Imagine taking the ultimate leap of faith, jumping out of an airplane with only a parachute to regulate your fall. Now, imagine that your descent could be captured on film, from your exact point of view. 

We'll let you in on a little secret, it’s possible.

Sips and Snacks for a Science-Filled New Year

New Years Eve is the perfect time to surround yourself with family and friends to celebrate the passing of another exciting year! 

2012 has been a wonderful year here at The Exchange, filled with new consults, fantastic events and plenty of new faces. We hope that this past year has been equally as extraordinary for you, and that 2013 will bring you opportunities for growth and prosperity. 

Plus, we all survived the Mayan Apocalypse, so give yourself a pat on the back!

Whether you are ringing in the new year at a festive bash, or plan on curling up on the couch with a furry friend and some snacks, we wanted to give you a few recipes to help you scientifically spice up your evening!

Below, you can find recipes for some delicious science-themed sips, sweets and snacks to spice up your night on December, 31st that will hopefully last you well into 2013. 

To Sip: 

Holiday Gift Guide for Science Lovers!

Welcome to The Science & Entertainment Exchange's Holiday Gift Guide for Science Lovers! Click the diagonal arrows in the top right-hand corner of the guide to expand the window and enable the interactive features. Hopefully you can find something for every budding scientist in your life!

Scream Off the Thanksgiving Pounds!

A recent study from the University of Westminster found that watching scary movies may help people burn calories and in turn, lose weight. 

The study suggests that watching scary movies may cause the viewer’s pulse to quicken and the body to experience a surge of adrenaline; two factors that are often seen in intensely stressful situations. Both are known to increase the viewer’s metabolic rate and decrease appetite, which could ultimately lead to calories being burned at a faster rate. 

In an unrelated study, the American Council on Fitness found that the average American enjoys around 3,000 calories and 229 grams of fat on Thanksgiving. That is 1,000 more calories than the suggested 2,000 calorie per day diet, not even considering the amount of fat we consume during that deliciously decadent meal! 

So, after all the turkey, gravy and stuffing have been enjoyed, it seems like the perfect time to take part in a scare-a-thon of epic proportions! 

When the far-fetched is no longer fantasy

Back to the Future Part II crashed into our lives almost 23 years ago, complete with hoverboards, facial recognition software, and a baseball team based in Miami.       Back to the Future, Part II Movie Poster

With 2015 not far off on the proverbial horizon, we thought we’d take a look at what Back to the Future Part II got right, and what has not quite made its way into our cultural lexicon.

The Polls Are Closed, So Are Statistics The Real Winner?

Moneyball Movie Poster

Barack Obama may have been officially announced as the winner of Tuesday night’s presidential election, but a statistical model could be crowned the victor in certain circles. 

Nate Silver, a political blogger for The New York Times, runs the website fivethirtyeight.com, which accurately predicted 100 percent of the 50 state results on Tuesday night. His site is aptly named for the 538 electoral votes up for grabs to win the presidential election. 

What sets Silver apart from most political junkies is that he does not just look at one poll and make projections, he looks at all of the polls. 

The Moon en Plein Aire

One of the key conclusions in my book is that scientist/filmmaker collaborations work best when the scientists and entertainment professionals clearly respect each other’s expertise. This means that the scientists, in particular, need to keep in mind that they know very little about making movies. This same advice applies to scientifically literate audiences. We need to remember that just as scientists are scientific experts, filmmakers are entertainment experts who make decisions about science based on their specialist knowledge of the way film operates and what makes a film enjoyable.

Biodiversity and Hollywood: A Fashionable Intersection

What would your favorite science-fiction movie be without the costumes? Most likely it would not be your favorite movie.

Fashion and costume choices set the stage for some of cinema’s most memorable moments. But what are movie sets made out of? Where was the cotton used to make the leading lady’s pants harvested? These questions can be explained by delving into the science of biodiversity.

Chase Mendenhall is a doctoral candidate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Stanford University. He explores the trade-offs between the conservation of biodiversity and farming by closely monitoring bird and bat populations that inhabit farmland in Costa Rica.

He is also one of two speakers who will be attending the Science Café at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, DC.

Applying Science to the Study of File Sharing Leads to a Startling Conclusion

Sometimes something happens in the entertainment industry that becomes the subject of scientific inquiry. Social scientists occasionally seek answers to questions important either to the entertainment industry, society at large, or both.
Take, for example, research being done in the field of economics. At least a dozen economists at several North American universities have been studying the impact file sharing has had on the music industry, in particular, sales of prerecorded music. Everyone is pretty much in agreement that file sharing, made possible and easy by advancements in computer and communications technology, adversely affected recording industry revenue during the 1990s and early 2000s. But how big a problem has it been? At least one economist thinks he has the answer, and it is rather startling.

Event Recap: Medical Miracles: Cutting Edge Health Technology

From cell phone apps that measure blood sugar levels to desktop printers that spit out new body organs, technology has come a long way in its role in health care. On July 25, The Science and Entertainment Exchange hosted Medical Miracles: Cutting Edge Health Technology at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles. The evening, which was moderated by humorist and radio commentator Emily Levine, looked at some astonishing recent breakthroughs in medicine that could one day help us all live longer.

Medical Miracles panel: Anthony Atala, Leslie Saxon, Emily Levine, Paul Weiss and Ken Kamler